programme

Psyche and Screen

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Course TypeCourse CodeNo. Of Credits
Foundation CoreSCC2FS1014

No of Credits: 4

Semester and Year Offered: Winter

Course Coordinator and Team: Dr Rajan Krishnan, Prof Anup Dhar

Email of course coordinator: rajan@aud.ac.in

No pre-requisites.

Course Objectives/Description:

The course explores the psychological link audience have with films that have widespread social consequences. In bringing some of the key texts exploring audience identification with the film narrative the course forms a key theoretical component of MA

Film Studies program. The course begins by tracking the development of thought in

Christian Metz in consideration of the idea of film language which leads him to Lacanian psychoanalysis. We read key texts of Stephen Heath, Laura Mulvey, Jean Copjec and Slovaj Zizek to explore the links between Lacanian pyschoanalytic principles and film form and experience.

Course Outcomes:

  • Enable students to understand theoretical ways of thinking about cinema. Thus, producing disciplinary knowledge of film studies.
  • Given that this course engages with cinema in relationship to the mind allows for reflective thinking.
  • This course allows for an engagement with a variety of transnational forms of cinema, prompting discussions of various aesthetic values and an appreciation thereof.

Brief description of modules/ Main modules:

See reading list below.

Assessment Details with weights:

  • Class Participation 30%
  • Weekly Responses 40%
  • End Semester Paper 30%

Reading List:

1. “The Cinema: Language or Language System?” Christian Metz in Film Langauge: A semiotics of the cinema, 1974, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

2. “The Imaginary Signifier” Christian Metz in Film and Theory: An Anthology, Robert Stam Toby Miller, (ed.) Blackwell Publishers, Oxford, 2000.

3. “Narrative Space” Stephen Heath in Questions of Cinema, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 1981.

4. “On Suture” Stephen Heath in Questions of Cinema, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 1981.

5. “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” Laura Mulvey in Film and Theory: An Anthology, Robert Stam Toby Miller, (ed.) Blackwell Publishers, Oxford, 2000.

6. “The Orthopsychic Subject: Film Theory and Reception of Lacan” Jean Copjec in Film and Theory: An Anthology, Robert Stam Toby Miller, (ed.) Blackwell Publishers, Oxford, 2000.

7. “Looking Awry” Slavoj Zizek in Film and Theory: An Anthology, Robert Stam Toby Miller, (ed.) Blackwell Publishers, Oxford, 2000.